Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Does the OECD Think That the South Should Rise Again?

A post at Wonkblog earlier this month noted that a recent analysis by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) of regional well-being across its member countries found that the U.S. South was “the worst place to live in the United States.” The OECD –as diplomatic as it is– did not say this in […]

“Wage Inequality: A Story of Policy Choices”

The September 2014 issue of New Labor Forum includes an article (paywalled) by Larry Mishel (President of the Economic Policy Institute), Heidi Shierholz (until recently an economist at EPI, now Chief Economist at the Department of Labor), and me offering our explanation for the rise in wage inequality since the end of the 1970s. From […]

Beyond Secular Stagnation

The new issue of Dissent has a special section, organized by SEIU Chief Economist Mark Levinson and me, on alternatives to economic stagnation. As Mark and I write in an introduction: “The special section seeks to provide a fuller, progressive answer to the question of how we should respond to stagnation. One common theme of […]

#WorkingFamilies Summit

In advance of next Monday’s “White House Summit on Working Families,” CEPR released a report this morning that looks at the role that unions can play in improving work-life balance, particularly for women. My colleagues, Janelle Jones and Nicole Woo, and I start from the observation that the typical woman spends far more time in […]

Why Don’t More People Go To College?

At the Upshot today, David Leonhardt asks if college is “worth it” and answers with a resounding “clearly,” citing data he obtained from the Economic Policy Institute. Leonhardt’s answer, however, raises a bigger question, which he leaves unexamined: if college is such a good investment, why aren’t more people making it? The data he presents […]

Cheese Eating Jobs Machine

On his blog today, Paul Krugman has a nice shout-out to a report that Dean Baker and I wrote for CEPR way back in 2006. In that eight-year-old report, Dean and I made the point that, despite widespread crowing about the US “jobs machine,” 25-to-54 year olds (what economists sometimes call “prime-age” workers) were more […]

Infographic on young black grads

My CEPR colleagues Shawn Jefferson and Milla Sanes designed this excellent infographic to accompany our new report (pdf) on the labor market outcomes of black recent college graduates.

Black recent college graduates

As Heidi Shierholz, Alyssa Davis, and Will Kimball have documented extensively in a recent report for the Economic Policy Institute, the Great Recession has been very hard on young college graduates. In a CEPR report released yesterday, Janelle Jones and I show that the tough economy has been even harder on black recent college graduates. […]

Piketty and Policy

Early on in his (rightly) highly complimentary review of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century, Paul Krugman declares: “This is a book that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics.” Krugman is certainly correct about the impact that Capital in the 21st Century will have on the way […]

Public-Sector Collective Bargaining in the States

Milla Sanes and I have a new CEPR report out today on the regulation of public-sector bargaining at the state-and-local level. The first two paragraphs give a short summary of the 68-page document: While the unionization of most private-sector workers is governed by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), the legal scope of collective bargaining […]